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Trojan:W32/Graftor

Classification

Category: Malware

Type: Trojan

Aliases: Trojan:W32/Graftor, Gen:variant.graftor.[variant]

Summary


A generic detection has identified a program or file that has features or behaviors similar to a trojan.

Generic detections are broad patterns of code or behavior that are used by security software to identify programs or files. If you suspect the detected file was incorrectly identified, go to: Removal: Resolve a False Positive.

Removal


Automatic action

Once detected, the F-Secure security product will automatically handle a harmful program or file by either deleting or renaming it.

Resolve a False Positive

Security programs will sometimes unintentionally identify a clean program or file as malicious if its code or behavior is similar to a known harmful program or file. This is known as a False Positive. In most cases, a False Positive is fixed in a subsequent database release. If you suspect the detected file is a False Positive, you can:

Knowledge Base

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About the product

See the manual for your F-Secure product on the Help Center.

Contact Support

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Submit a sample

Submit a file or URL for further analysis.

Technical Details


Named after the Trojan Horse of Greek legend, a trojan is a program or file that has, or appears to have, a useful or desirable function to encourage the user to install the program or open the file. For example, it may appear to be a screensaver, a service pack, an application update and so on.

Installation

Trojans rely on tricking the user into believing that the program is authentic, so that they unwittingly install the program themselves.

To do this, most trojans mimic or entirely copy the style and branding of popular legitimate programs or files. Some trojans (particularly on the Android platform) are actually copies of legitimate apps that have been repackaged or trojanized to include harmful components.

Once installed or opened, the trojan may perform its promised function, or display a decoy document to distract the user. In the background however, it also silently performs unauthorized actions (its payload), without the user's knowledge or consent.

Impact

Depending on its creator's intent, a trojan's payload can range from:

  • Mildly annoying pranks, like changing desktop icon positions, to
  • Serious, user-inhibiting actions, like disabling the keyboard or mouse, to
  • Critically destructive actions, like erasing files or stealing data

It is often very difficult for users to realize that a trojan is performing harmful actions, as they are usually well camouflaged to keep the system from triggering any notification messages that might arouse the user's suspicions.