Backdoor

Threat description

Details

CATEGORYMalware
TYPEBackdoor

Summary

A remote administration utility that bypasses normal security mechanisms to secretly control a program, computer or network.



Removal

Automatic action

Once detected, the F-Secure security product will automatically disinfect the suspect file by either deleting it or renaming it.

More scanning & removal options

More information on the scanning and removal options available in your F-Secure product can be found in the Help Center.

You may also refer to the Knowledge Base on the F-Secure Community site for further assistance.

Security programs will sometimes unintentionally identify a clean program or file as malicious if its code or behavior is similar to a known harmful program or file. This is known as a False Alarm or False Positive (FP).

For example, 'tmp.edb' and other '.edb' files stored at the location 'C:\WINDOWS\SoftwareDistribution\DataStore\Logs\' may be unintentionally detected as malicious by various security programs.

Checking for a fix

In most cases, a False Positive is fixed in a subsequent database release; updating your F-Secure security product to use the latest database is enough to resolve the issue. If you suspect a detected file may be a False Positive, you can check by first updating your F-Secure security product to use the latest detection database updates, then rescanning the suspect file.

Send a sample to F-Secure Labs

After checking, if you believe the file or program is still incorrectly detected, you can submit a sample of it to F-Secure Labs for analysis and correction:

Exclude a known safe file from further scanning

If you are positive that the suspect file is safe and you want to continue using it, you can exclude it from further scanning by the F-Secure security product:

You may also refer to the Knowledge Base on the F-Secure Community site for more assistance.

Also

Microsoft provides enterprise-level instructions for excluding files from scanning by antivirus software:

Technical Details

A Backdoor is a remote administration utility that allows a user access and control a computer, usually remotely over a network or the Internet. A backdoor is usually able to gain control of a system because it exploits undocumented processes in the system's code.

These utilities may be legitimate, and may be used for legitimate reasons by authorized administrators, but they are also frequently used by attackers to gain control of a user's machine without their knowledge or authorization.

A typical backdoor consists of 2 components - the client and its server(s). An attacker will use a client application to communicate with the server components, which are installed on the victim's system. The server components can be delivered to the victim's system in numerous ways - as part of a worm or trojan payload, as an e-mail attachment, as a tantalizingly-named file on peer-to-peer networks, etc.

Once installed, the server component will open a network port and communicate with the client, to indicate that the computer is infected and vulnerable. An attacker can then use the backdoor's client to issue commands to the infected system. Depending on how sophisticated a client is, it can include such features as:

  • Sending and receiving files
  • Browsing through the hard drives and network drives
  • Getting system information
  • Taking screenshots
  • Changing the date/time and settings
  • Playing tricks like opening and closing the CD-ROM tray

and so on.

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